Why MATs need to sharpen their strategy

Chris Kirk - 8 November, 2018

Category : Blog

Why MATs need to sharpen their strategy

A vision for Multi Academy Trusts: a 5-part blog series written for Arbor by Chris Kirk, Ex-Partner for Education at PWC and formerly GEMS/DfE.  The launch of the Confederation of School Trusts on Thursday 11 October 2018 is a huge step forwards for those of us who believe it is essential that we create a school

A vision for Multi Academy Trusts: a 5-part blog series written for Arbor by Chris Kirk, Ex-Partner for Education at PWC and formerly GEMS/DfE. 

The launch of the Confederation of School Trusts on Thursday 11 October 2018 is a huge step forwards for those of us who believe it is essential that we create a school system which is led from the middle.  For this to be a reality, we need to increase the pace of development of MATs as highly effective networks of schools, collaborating not only within, but between Trusts.

This five part blog sets out a framework for sharpening MAT strategy with powerful principles and core capabilities, followed by three stages of growth:

  • Putting the basics in place;
  • Creating an integrated MAT;
  • Systematic collaboration.

Why MATs need to sharpen their strategy

Strategy varies between MATs, which is a good thing

When asked about the focus of their strategy, MATs give a wide range of responses.  Most MATs seek to preserve school identity whilst improving back office efficiency – often by centralising systems and staff – with a collaborative approach to standardisation. But there are much wider ranges of views when it comes to scaling tried and tested school improvement models, creating consistent pedagogy, boosting local governance, or MAT-wide enrichment programmes.  

However, sometimes strategy varies within a MAT, which points to lack of clarity

This variation in MAT strategy is in my view a good thing, as there is certainly not one right way to work: context is very important, and very different between MATs.  What is more surprising is that our research indicates that there is just as much variation of view of strategy within many MATs.  This is less welcome.  The most effective leaders have the ability to develop a vision which is strongly influenced by their followers’ needs, creating a climate of collective aspirations.  Within a MAT, this must surely mean a clear vision focused on the difference made for students, schools, communities and the system, supported by a realistic and shared strategy which is honest about capacity and has high expectations for all.

It follows then that a significant task for MAT leaders is to build a common vision and view of strategy within their MAT.  In the second blog in this series I will set out 6 principles and 6 core competencies that I believe should underpin every MAT vision.

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